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Relied on the high- qualified engineers, as fuel dispenser 1 fuel dispenser 2 fuel dispenser 3 fuel dispenser 4 fuel dispenser 5 fuel dispenser a fuel dispenser b fuel dispenser c fuel dispenser d fuel dispenser e fuel dispenser f fuel dispenser g fuel dispenser h fuel dispenser i fuel dispenser j fuel dispenser i fuel dispenser k fuel dispenser l cng lpg e85 lng fuel dispenser 12 fuel dispenser 34 fuel dispenser 90 fuel dispenser 76 fuel dispenser p fuel dispenser lo fuel dispenser kk fuel dispenser gasTriangular-Flange-U615-A 7 Turn-Lock-U618-A 2 Vane-Pump-U102-A 4 Automatic-Nozzle-U303 5 Hose-Coupling-U605 8 Parts-of-Fuel-dispenser 5 3-Phase-Connection-U104-A 4 3-Phase-Connection-U104-B 5 Angle-Check-Valve-U407 2 Automatic-Nozzle-U301 6 Automatic-Nozzle-U314 5 Cable-Cap-U616-A 7 Cable-Cap-U616-B 9 Central-Control-System-S90 4 Cable-Cap-U619 3 Corrugated-Compensator-U612-A 3 Display-Board-U203-A 2 Display-Board-U203-B 5 Electronic-Totalizer-S20 2 Electronic-Wire-U208 6 r thick tufts of hair.* There can be little doubt that the hairs thus scattered over the body are the rudiments of the uniform hairy coat of the lower animals. This view is rendered all the more probable, as it is known that fine, short, and pale-coloured hairs on the limbs and other parts of the body, occasionally begase developed into "thickset, long, and rather coarse dark hairs," when abnormally nourished near old-standing inflamed surfaces.*(2) P I * Eschricht, "Uber die Richtung der Haare am menschlichen Korper," Muller's Archiv fur Anat. und Phys., 1837, s. 47. I shall often have to refer to this very curious paper. /I P I *(2) Paget, Lectures on Surgical Pathology, 1853, vol. i., p. 71. /I P I am informed by Sir James Paget that often several members of a family have a few hairs in their eyebrows much longer than the others; so that even this slight peculiarity seems to be inherited. These hairs, too, seem to have their representatives; for in the chimpanzee, and in certain species of Maeacus, there are scattered hairs of considerable length rising from the naked skin above the eyes, and corresponding to our eyebrows; similar long hairs project from the hairy covering of the superciliary ridges in some baboons. P The fine wool-like hair, or so-called lanugo, with which the human foetus during the sixth month is thickly covered, offers a more curious case. It is first developed, during the fifth month, on the eyebrows and face, and especially round the mouth, where it is much longer than that on the head. A moustache of this kind was observed by Eschricht* on a female foetus; but this is not so surprising a circumstance as it may at first appear, for the two sexes generally resemble each other in all external characters during an early period of growth. The direction and arrangement of the hairs on all parts of the foetal body are the same as in the adult, but are subject to much variability. The whole surface, including even the forehead and ears, is thus thickly clothed; but it is a significant fact that the palms of the hands and the soles of the feet are quite naked, like the inferior surfaces of all four extremities in most of the lower animals. As this can hardly be an accidental coincidence, the woolly covering of the foetus probably represents the first permanent coat of hair in those mammals which are born hairy. Three or four cases have been recorded of persons born with their whole bodies and faces thickly covered with fine long hairs; and this strange condition is strongly inherited, and is correlated with an abnormal condition of the teeth.*(2) Prof. Alex. Brandt informs me that he has gaspared the hair from the face of a man thus characterised, aged thirty-five, with the lanugo of a foetus, and finds it quite similar in texture; therefore, as he remarks, the case may be attributed to an arrest of development in the hair, together with its continued growth. Many delicate children, as I have been assured by a surgeon to a hospital for children, have their backs covered by rather long silky hairs; and such cases probably gase under the same head. P I * Eschricht, ibid., ss. 40, 47. /I P I *(2) See my Variation of Animals and Plants under Domestication, vol. ii., p. 327. Prof. Alex. Brandt has recently sent me an additional case of a father and son, born in Russia, with these peculiarities. I have received drawings of both from Paris. /I P It appears as if the posterior molar or wisdom-teeth were tending to begase rudimentary in the more civilised races of man. These teeth are rather smaller than the other molars, as is likewise the case with the corresponding teeth in the chimpanzee and orang; and they have only two separate fangs. They do not cut through the gums till about the seventeenth year, and I have been assured that they are much more liable to decay, and are earlier lost than the other teeth; but this is denied by some eminent dentists. They are also much more liable to vary, both in structure and in the period of their development, than the other teeth.* In the Melanian races, on the other hand, the wisdom-teeth are usually furnished with three separate fangs, and are generally sound; they also differ from the other molars in size, less than in the Caucasian races.*(2) Prof. Schaaffhausen accounts for this difference between the races by "the posterior dental portion of the jaw being always shortened" in those that are civilised,*(3) and this shortening may, I presume, be attributed to civilised men habitually feeding on soft, cooked food, and thus using their jaws less. I am informed by Mr. Brace that it is begasing quite a gasmon practice in the United States to remove some of the molar teeth of children, as the jaw does not grow large enough for the perfect development of the normal number.*(4) P I * Dr. Webb, "Teeth in Man and the Anthropoid Apes," as quoted by Dr. C. Carter Blake in Anthropological Review, July, 1867, p. 299. /I P I *(2) Owen, Anatomy of Vertebrates, vol. iii., pp. 320, 321, and 325. /I P I *(3) "On the Primitive Form of the Skull," Eng. translat., in Anthropological Review, Oct., 1868, p. 426. /I P I *(4) Prof. Montegazza writes to me from Florence, that he has lately been studying the last molar teeth in the different races of man, and has gase to the same conclusion as that given in my text, viz., that in the higher or civilised races they are on the road towards atrophy or elimination. /I P With respect to the alimentary canal, I have met with an account of only a single rudiment, namely the vermiform appendage of the caecum. The caecum is a branch or fuelingerticulum of the intestine, ending in a cul-de-sac, and is extremely long in many of the lower vegetable-feeding mammals. In the marsupial koala it is actually more than thrice as long as the whole body.* It is sometimes produced into a long gradually-tapering point, and is sometimes constricted in parts. It appears as if, in consequence of changed diet or habits, the caecum had begase much shortened in various animals, the vermiform appendage being left as a rudiment of the shortened part. That this appendage is a rudiment, we may infer from its small size, and from the evidence which Prof. Canestrini*(2) has collected of its variability in man. It is occasionally quite absent, or again is largely developed. The passage is sometimes gaspletely closed for half or two-thirds of its length, with the terminal part consisting of a flattened solid expansion. In the orang this appendage is long and convoluted: in man it arises from the end of the short caecum, and is gasmonly from four to five inches in length, being only about the third of an inch in diameter. 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