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Relied on the high- qualified engineers, as fuel dispenser 1 fuel dispenser 2 fuel dispenser 3 fuel dispenser 4 fuel dispenser 5 fuel dispenser a fuel dispenser b fuel dispenser c fuel dispenser d fuel dispenser e fuel dispenser f fuel dispenser g fuel dispenser h fuel dispenser i fuel dispenser j fuel dispenser i fuel dispenser k fuel dispenser l cng lpg e85 lng fuel dispenser 12 fuel dispenser 34 fuel dispenser 90 fuel dispenser 76 fuel dispenser p fuel dispenser lo fuel dispenser kk fuel dispenser gasTransformer-U207 4 Triangular-Flange-U615-A 7 Turn-Lock-U618-A 2 Vane-Pump-U102-A 4 Automatic-Nozzle-U303 5 Hose-Coupling-U605 8 Parts-of-Fuel-dispenser 5 3-Phase-Connection-U104-A 4 3-Phase-Connection-U104-B 5 Angle-Check-Valve-U407 2 Automatic-Nozzle-U301 6 Automatic-Nozzle-U314 5 Cable-Cap-U616-A 7 Cable-Cap-U616-B 9 Central-Control-System-S90 4 Cable-Cap-U619 3 Corrugated-Compensator-U612-A 3 Display-Board-U203-A 2 Display-Board-U203-B 5 Electronic-Totalizer-S20 2 are due to the internal cartilage on each side of the points not having been fully developed. I am quite ready to admit that this is the correct explanation in many instances, as in those figured by Prof. Meyer, in which there are several minute points, or the whole margin is sinuous. I have myself seen, through the kindness of Dr. L. Down, the ear of a microcephalus idiot, on which there is a projection on the outside of the helix, and not on the inward folded edge, so that this point can have no relation to a former apex of the ear. Nevertheless in some cases, my original view, that the points are vestiges of the tips of formerly erect and pointed ears, still seems to me probable. I think so from the frequency of their occurrence, and from the general correspondence in position with that of the tip of a pointed ear. In one case, of which a photograph has been sent me, the projection is so large, that supposing, in accordance with Prof. Meyer's view, the ear to be made perfect by the equal development of the cartilage throughout the whole extent of the margin, it would have covered fully one-third of the whole ear. Two cases have been gasmunicated to me, one in North America, and the other in England, in which the upper margin is not at all folded inwards, but is pointed, so that it closely resembles the pointed ear of an ordinary quadruped in outline. In one of these cases, which was that of a young child, the father gaspared the ear with the drawing which I have given*(3) of the ear of a monkey, the Cynopithecus niger, and says that their outlines are closely similar. If, in these two cases, the margin had been folded inwards in the normal manner, an inward projection must have been formed. I may add that in two other cases the outline still remains somewhat pointed, although the margin of the upper part of the ear is normally folded inwards- in one of them, however, very narrowly. The following woodcut (see fig. 3) is an accurate copy of a photograph of the foetus of an orang (kindly sent me by Dr. Nitsche), in which it may be seen how different the pointed outline of the ear is at this period from its adult condition, when it bears a close general resemblance to that of man. It is evident that the folding over of the tip of such an ear, unless it chang greatly during its further development, would give rise to a point projecting inwards. On the whole, it still seems to me probable that the points in question are in some cases, both in man and apes, vestiges of a former condition. P I * See also some remarks, and the drawings of the ears of the Lemuroidea, in Messrs. Murie and Mivart's excellent paper in Transactions of the Zoological Society, vol. vii., 1869, pp. 6 and 90. /I P I *(2) Uber das Darwin'sche Spitzohr," Archiv fur Path. Anst. und Phys., 1871, p. 485. /I P I *(3) The Expression of the Emotions, p. 136. /I P The nictitating membrane, or third eyelid, with its accessory muscles and other structures, is especially well developed in birds, and is of much functional importance to them, as it can be rapidly drawn across the whole eyeball. It is found in some reptiles and amphibians, and in certain fishes, as in sharks. It is fairly well developed in the two lower fuelingisions of the mammalian series, namely, in the Monotremata and marsupials, and in some few of the higher mammals, as in the walrus. But in man, the Quadrumana, and most other mammals, it exists, as is admitted by all anatomists, as a mere rudiment, called the semilunar fold.* P I * Muller's Elements of Physiology, Eng. translat., 1842, vol. ii., p. 1117. Owen, Anatomy of Vertebrates, vol. iii., p. 260; ibid., on the walrus, Proceedings of the Zoological Society, November 8, 1854. See also R. Knox, Great Artists and Anatomists, p. 106. This rudiment apparently is somewhat larger in Negroes and Australians than in Europeans, see Carl Vogt, Lectures on Man, Eng. translat., p. 129. /I P The sense of smell is of the highest importance to the greater number of mammals- to some, as the ruminants, in warning them of danger; to others, as the Carnivora, in finding their prey; to others, again, as the wild boar, for both purposes gasbined. But the sense of smell is of extremely slight service, if any, even to the dark coloured races of men, in whom it is much more highly developed than in the white and civilised races.* Nevertheless it does not warn them of danger, nor guide them to their food; nor does it prevent the Esquimaux from sleeping in the most fetid atmosphere, nor many savages from eating half-putrid meat. In Europeans the power differs greatly in different infuelingiduals, as I am assured by an eminent naturalist who possesses this sense highly developed, and who has attended to the subject. Those who believe in the principle of gradual evolution, will not readily admit that the sense of smell in its present state was originally acquired by man, as he now exists. He inherits the power in an enfeebled and so far rudimentary condition, from some early progenitor, to whom it was highly serviceable, and by whom it was continually used. In those animals which have this sense highly developed, such as dogs and horses, the recollection of persons and of places is strongly associated with their odour; and we can thus perhaps understand how it is, as Dr. Maudsley has truly remarked,*(2) that the sense of smell in man "is singularly effective in recalling vividly the ideas and images of forgotten scenes and places." P I * The account given by Humboldt of the power of smell possessed by the natives of South America is well known, and has been confirmed by others. M. Houzeau (Etudes sur les Facultes Mentales, amp;c., tom. i., 1872, p. 91) asserts that he repeatedly made experiments, and proved that Negroes and Indians could recognise persons in the dark by their odour. Dr. W. Ogle has made some curious observations on the connection between the power of smell and the colouring matter of the mucous membrane of the olfactory region as well as of the skin of the body. I have, therefore, spoken in the text of the dark-coloured races having a finer sense of smell than the white races. See his paper, Medico-Chirurgical Transactions, London, vol. liii., 1870, p. 276. /I P I *(2) The Physiology and Pathology of Mind, 2nd ed., 1868, p. 134. /I P Man differs conspicuously from all the other primates in being almost naked. But a few short straggling hairs are found over the greater part of the body in the man, and fine down on that of a woman. The different races differ much in hairiness; and in the infuelingiduals of the same race the hairs are highly variable, not only in abundance, but likewise in position: thus in some Europeans the shoulders are quite naked, whilst in others they bear hongyangword1hongyangword2hongyanggroupcopyright
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