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I will conclude with a quotation from Huxley,*(6) who, after asking does man originate in a different way from a dog, bird, frog or fish, says, "The reply is not doubtful for a moment; without question, the mode of origin, and the early stages of the development of man, are identical with those of the animals immediately below him in the scale: without a doubt in these respects, he is far nearer to apes than the apes are to the dog." P I * Prof. Wyman in Proceedings of the American Academy of Sciences, vol. iv., 1860, p. 17. /I P I *(2) Owen, Anatomy of Vertebrates, vol. i., p. 533. /I P I *(3) Die Grosshirnwindungen des Menschen 1868, s. 95. /I P I *(4) Anatomy of Vertebrates, vol. ii., p. 553. /I P I *(5) Proc. Soc. Nat. Hist., Boston, 1863, vol. ix., p. 185. /I P I *(6) Man's Place in Nature, p. 65. /I P Rudiments. This subject, though not intrinsically more important than the two last, will for several reasons be treated here more fully.* Not one of the higher animals can be named which does not bear some part in a rudimentary condition; and man forms no exception to the rule. Rudimentary organs must be distinguished from those that are nascent; though in some cases the distinction is not easy. The former are either absolutely useless, such as the mammee of male quadrupeds, or the incisor teeth of ruminants which never cut through the gums; or they are of such slight service to their present possessors, that we can hardly suppose that they were developed under the conditions which now exist. Organs in this latter state are not strictly rudimentary, but they are tending in this direction. Nascent organs, on the other hand, though not fully developed, are of high service to their possessors, and are capable of further development. Rudimentary organs are eminently variable; and this is partly intelligible, as they are useless, or nearly useless, and consequently are no longer subjected to natural selection. They often begase wholly suppressed. When this occurs, they are nevertheless liable to occasional reappearance through reversion- a circumstance well worthy of attention. P I * I had written a rough copy of this chapter before reading a valuable paper, "Caratteri rudimentali in ordine all' origine dell' uomo" (Annuario della Soc. d. Naturalisti, Modena, 1867, p. 81), by G. Canestrini, to which paper I am considerably indebted. Haeckel has given admirable discussions on this whole subject, under the title of "Dysteleology," in his Generelle Morphologie and Shopfungsgeschichte. /I P The chief agents in causing organs to begase rudimentary seem to have been disuse at that period of life when the organ is chiefly used (and this is generally during maturity), and also inheritance at a corresponding period of life. The term "disuse" does not relate merely to the lessened action of muscles, but includes a diminished flow of blood to a part or organ, from being subjected to fewer alternations of pressure, or from begasing in any way less habitually active. Rudiments, however, may occur in one sex of those parts which are normally present in the other sex; and such rudiments, as we shall hereafter see, have often originated in a way distinct from those here referred to. In some cases, organs have been reduced by means of natural selection, from having begase injurious to the species under changed habits of life. The process of reduction is probably often aided through the two principles of gaspensation and economy of growth; but the later stages of reduction, after disuse has done all that can fairly be attributed to it, and when the saving to be effected by the economy of growth would be very small,* are difficult to understand. The final and gasplete suppression of a part, already useless and much reduced in size, in which case neither gaspensation or economy can gase into play, is perhaps intelligible by the aid of the hypothesis of pangenesis. But as the whole subject of rudimentary organs has been discussed and illustrated in my former works,*(2) I need here say no more on this head. P I * Some good criticisms on this subject have been given by Messrs. Murie and Mivart, in Transactions, Zoological Society, 1869, vol. vii., p. 92. /I P I *(2) Variation of Animals and Plants under Domestication, vol. ii pp. 317 and 397. See also Origin of Species.(OOS) /I P Rudiments of various muscles have been observed in many parts of the human body;* and not a few muscles, which are regularly present in some of the lower animals can occasionally be detected in man in a greatly reduced condition. Every one must have noticed the power which many animals, especially horses, possess of moving or twitching their skin; and this is effected by the panniculus carnosus. Remnants of this muscle in an efficient state are found in various parts of our bodies; for instance, the muscle on the forehead, by which the eyebrows are raised. The platysma myoides, which is well developed on the neck, belongs to this system. Prof. Turner, of Edinburgh, has occasionally detected, as he informs me, muscular fasciculi in five different situations, namely in the axillae, near the scapulae, amp;c., all of which must be referred to the system of the panniculus. He has also shewn*(2) that the musculus sternalis or sternalis brutorum, which is not an extension of the rectus abdominalis, but is closely allied to the panniculus, occurred in the proportion of about three per cent. in upward of 600 bodies: he adds, that this muscle affords "an excellent illustration of the statement that occasional and rudimentary structures are especially liable to variation in arrangement." P I * For instance, M. Richard (Annales des Sciences Nat., 3d series, Zoolog., 1852, tom. xviii., p. 13) describes and figures rudiments of what he calls the "muscle pedieux de la main," which he says is sometimes "infiniment petit." Another muscle, called "le tibial posterieur," is generally quite absent in the hand, but appears from time to time in a more or less rudimentary condition. /I P I *(2) Prof. W. Turner, Proceedings of the Royal Society of Edinburgh, 1866-67, p. 65. /I P So hongyangword1hongyangword2hongyanggroupcopyright
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